gems wisdom

LIVING with CHRONIC COMPLEX PTSD

LIVING with CHRONIC COMPLEX PTSD   Are you living with chronic complex PTSD? Do you feel ashamed because you or others think you should be better by now? Are your expectations of healing realistic for you? Do you think that after x-amount of months or years of therapy, group therapy, self-help books, etc. that your healing should be finished or at least you should feel more healed?! Are you feeling pressured from others to get better or be better or act better? What is in your control? What expectations are realistic for you? It is difficult to suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or any illness or disorder. An illness or disorder that is not visible may provide different challenges. People tend to have more compassion for a person who has visible wounds, a cast, a wheelchair, etc. or who is recovering from a heart attack or stroke or cancer. When I lived in Germany, I was given the opportunity to perform an act of kindness. Someone asked me to give a ride to an elderly couple that I had never met. This small deed led to a friendship of special proportions. Denise and her husband lived in another part …

depression

DEPRESSION, SOCIETY, LIFE …

DEPRESSION, SOCIETY, LIFE …   Depression, society, life … How does society contribute to an individual’s depression? Why are more people in certain countries (such as the United States) treated with anti-depressants in greater numbers than in other countries? Do anti-depressants work? If anti-depressants are effective, for whom do they work? How long are these pills effective? What are other causes for depression? What solutions are there for treating major depression? Can we find creative ways to lessen one’s darkness? Are there societal prescriptions as well as individual ones? Today I am asking questions. As a person who suffers from major depression as well as PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and panic/anxiety, I find the questions worth asking. The answers vary. Recently I read the book titled “Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions” by Johann Hari.  I highly recommend this book. Whether you agree or disagree with Johann Hari, there are ideas in “Lost Connections” worth considering, pondering, and examining.  (For more information on his book, see: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34921573-lost-connections) Does loneliness enter the picture? What roles do shame and humiliation play in depression? Johann Hari covers these subjects in “Lost Connections”. If you are …